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Microscopes

  1. How to Read a Vernier Scale
    April 08, 2021
    Vernier scales can be used on microscopes, stereotaxic frames and micromanipulators. The vernier scale was invented by French mathematician Pierre Vernier in 1631 as an upgrade on Pedro Nunes' measurement system for precision astrolobes. With a main scale and a sliding secondary scale, a vernier is used for making precise measurements.    How a Vernier Scale Works The vernier scale is marked with divisions slightly smaller than the divisions of the main scale. For example, a vernier scale could have 11 markings for every 10 on the main scale. That's 10 divisions on the vernier scale for every 9 on the main scale. This means that the vernier divisions are each 90% of the main scale divisions. In this case, the 0-line and the 10-line on the vernier could pair up with marks on the main scale, but none of the other divisions on the vernier would match a line of the main scale. For example, the 0 and 10-lines of the vernier scale could pair up with the 0 and 9-lines on the main scale. If the 0-line pairs up with a mark, the first division of the vernier (1 mark) would be 10% short of reaching a mark of the main scale, the second division (2 mark) would miss a mark on the main scale by 20%, the third division (3 mark) would miss a mark on the main scale by 30%, etc.   How to Read a Linear Vernier Scale Follow these steps to read the vernier scale: Read the main scale. Look for the last whole increment visible before the 0 (zero) mark. Read the secondary scale (Vernier) measurement. This is the division tick mark that lines up best with a mark on the main scale. Add the two measurements together. The image at the right shows a linear scale. The 0 on the vernier scale lines up with the 4 on the main scale. Notice that the 10 on the vernier scale also lines up with a mark on the main scale (4.9). We ignore the second mark that lines up. So, the measurement shown is 4.00mm. The second
  2. Protect Cell Survival and Improve Research Results with Fluorodishes Cell Culture Dishes
    June 16, 2020
    [by Alec Dickson]  WPI's FluoroDish™ tissue culture dishes provide exceptional imaging quality for many applications requiring the use of inverted microscopes such as high-resolution image analysis, microinjection and electrophysical recording of fluorescent-tagged cells. We have a 50 mm diameter dish and two types of 35 mm diameter dishes.        Better O
  3. Microscope Chamber Setup for Live Cell Imaging
    July 02, 2014
    Watch as Barney and Kelly Boyce set up an InVivo microscope chamber. Ideal for live cell imaging, the chambers, along with heaters, carbon dioxide and oxygen controllers and stagetop environments are sold by World Precision Instruments. See Selection
  4. How to Assemble a SurgioScope
    September 16, 2013
    The PSMB5N Surgical Microscope has a motorized focusing system that allows for hands free operation. It is lightweight, compact and easy to maneuver. Dual bulbs prevent illumination failure during surgery. It has an optional video adapter and five magnification steps. This video shows you how to assemble your microscope. Safety is a primary concern when setting up equipment. Here are a few pointers. This setup requires open space to work in. Be sure to remove the packing materials as soon as you unpack your boxes. Watch your hands when you are using a box cutter. The articulating arm is spring loaded. Be sure to release the tension on it in a controlled manner. Be sure to remove all parts from the boxes before you throw the boxes out. The base of the microscope is heavy. It requries two people to remove the base from the box. If you drop the base, you will likely break the casters. Do not invert the microscope head with the eyepieces in place. They could fall out and are expensive to replace. More Info
  5. How to Add a Camera to a Surgical Microscope
    September 16, 2013
    Watch as Gabe turns a binocular surgical microscope into a trinocular microscope and adds a video camera.   See Selection
  6. Using a Microscope with a Stereotaxic Frame
    April 30, 2013
    You can use the PZMIV stereo microscope with a stereotaxic frame as shown in the image below. This setup shows a PZMIV-BS. The U-frame Base Plate (502045) is shown, but most stereotaxic frames can be used in this way. Choose a stereo microscope objective that allows you plenty of room to work. For example, the 0.5X objective has 187mm working distance, or the 0.32X objective has 296mm working distance. You could also add a Z-LITE-Z186 illuminator. If necessary, use a 5 to 10 lb.counter weight on the boom stand base to prevent the microscope from tipping.
  7. Microscope Basics
    April 29, 2013
    Microscopes are a standard laboratory tool, but purchasing the right microscope for a particular application can be a challenge. First, consider how you will use the instrument. Are you looking at slides, dissecting a small animal or performing a surgery? (The application dictates the necessary working distance and power of magnification.) What kind of a stand will you be using? (Boom stand, articulating arm or post stand) Will the microscope be used in a classroom setting? (A trinocular scope offers the option of including a camera.) Will you need a camera?
  8. Understanding Microscope Objectives
    April 29, 2013
    NOTE: For an introduction to microscopes, see Microscope Basics. A variety of microscope objectives are available. All objectives use lenses to focus light. Light is broken down into various wavelengths (colors) as it travels through a lens. The various wavelengths have different focal points. That means that red, green and blue appears to focus at different points. This is called chromatic aberration. Spherical aberrations are focal mismatches caused by the shape of the lens. Quality lenses are designed correct for chromatic and spherical aberration to bring the primary colors to a common focal point. These terms may help you determine the best objective for your application: Achromatic objectives–This objective brings red and blue light to a common focus, and is corrected for spherical aberrations for green. It is excellent for black and white viewing. If an objective i
  9. Choosing a Microscope Camera
    April 29, 2013
    Types It is common for a researcher to attach a camera to a microscope. Three types of cameras are available, and two are suitable for microscopy work: Television (Direct video) 4:3 old style video, NTSC, PAL, 480i 16:9 HDTV (DVI 1.0 compliant), 720P Computer capture USB connection Firewire connection Commercial cameras Fixed lens cameras SLR cameras First, determine what you want to do: Capture images View live video The cameras that do both are more expensive. Lower cost options capable of live view and image capture usually are capable of capturing fewer frames per second. Television Style Cameras Television style cameras send live video images to a television set. They can use the old 4:3 (boxy) format or the new 16:9 cinematic format. These cameras do not come
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