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surgical instruments

  1. How to Clean Surgical Instruments Using an Ultrasonic Cleaner
    March 13, 2019
    Prior to sterilizing surgical instruments, it is a good idea to make sure you have cleaned them to remove blood, tissue and all other organic material.  If soiled materials dries or is baked onto the instruments, it will interfere with microbial inaction and can compromise the sterilization process. Cleaning is the removal of foreign material (e.g., soil and organic material) from objects and is normally accomplished using water with detergents or enzymatic products. The most common type of mechanical automatic cleaner is the ultrasonic cleaner. Ultrasonic cleaners are used in conjunction with detergents and enzymatic cleaners.  Ultrasonic cleaning removes particulates by cavitation (bubbles) and implosion. Waves of acoustic energy are transmitted in aqueous solutions and disrupt the bonds that hold particulate m
  2. Caring for your Surgical Instrument Investment
    October 17, 2014
    What's the difference between cleaning, disinfecting and sterilizing? Let's take a look. This is the first in a series of four videos to discuss some best practices in caring for your surgical instrument investment.   In video #2, you can see how to manually clean surgical instruments. It is loaded with tips. This video is the second in a series of four to discuss some best practices in caring for your surgical instrument investment.    In video #3, you can see how to mechanically clean surgical instruments using an ultrasonic cleaner. This video is loaded with tips. This video is the third in a series of four to discuss some best practices in caring for your surgical instrument in
  3. WPI Instruments featured in JoVE Video on Cross-Pollination
    October 03, 2013
    WPI surgical instruments were recently featured in a JoVE video that demonstrates a new method for cross pollinating grasses.   More Info Jiang, H., Barbier, H., Brutnell, T. Methods for Performing Crosses in Setaria viridis, a New Model System for the Grasses. J. Vis. Exp. (80), e50527, doi:10.3791/50527 (2013).
  4. Which Alloy is Best for My Surgical Instruments?
    April 30, 2013
    Inox, Titanium, Dumoxel®, Dumastar®, Antimagnetic... Have you ever looked at the variety of metal alloys for surgical instruments and laboratory tools and wondered which is best for your needs? Here's a brief rundown. Stainless Steel (Inox) - Our standard line of instruments are manufactured of highest quality materials, they are made of austenitic 316 steel commonly known as “surgical steel” or “marine grade steel.” Stainless steel, also known as Inox (from the French word "inoxydable"), is highly corrosion resistant and it is a common choice of material for biomedical implants or body piercing jewelery. It is in compliance with ASTM F138. This WPI line is an excellent alternative to German surgical instruments. The high-quality, corrosion-resistant instruments are available at a fraction
  5. INs and OUTs of Surgical Needles for Suturing
    April 24, 2013
    Surgical needles are specifically designed for their application. The diagram below shows the difference between cutting edge and taper point needles. Cutting edge needles have sharp edges that penetrate easily through tough tissue. They are ideal for suturing skin and dense dermal tissue.    Taper point needles pierce and spread tissue without cutting it. They are ideal for suturing delicate, soft tissue when minimal trauma is desired.
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