Ophthalmology

Ophthalmology

These instruments, designed for ophthalmology are comprised of titanium and stainless steel instruments.

  1. Forceps
    Tweezer, forceps, needle pullers – here's some information on selecting the proper forceps for your application. Choosing Surgical Forceps Surgical forceps may be broadly divided into two categories, thumb forceps (frequently called tweezers or pinning forceps) and ring forceps (also called hemostats, hemostatic forceps and locking forceps). Thumb forceps are spring forceps used by compression between your thumb and forefinger and are used for grasping, holding or manipulating body tissue. They are non-ratchet style. For example, you could use thumb forceps to hold or move tissue during surgery or to move dressings. Hemostatic forceps are hinged forceps that look more like scissors. Hinged forceps may come with or without a "lock" for clamping. Thumb forceps are available with a variety of tips. The tips may be flat, serrated, cupped, ringed, grooved, diamond dusted or have teeth. The tips may also be straight, curved or angled. See the images below. Serrated tweezers (thumb forceps) are designed for use with tissues. The serrations or teeth actually cause less damage than flat forceps, because it requires less pressure to maintain a firm grip. Use smooth or cross-hatched forceps for removing sutures, moving dressing or other drapes. Commonly used thumb forceps include Adson forceps, Iris forceps and Foester forceps. Locking forceps may be called clamps and are used to securely hold tissue. When they are used to control blood flow, they are called hemostats. When used to grasp and manipulate needles, they are called needle holders.
  2. Hooks & Probes
    Hooks and probes may be used for lifting and retracting tissues. For example, a dura hook is used to retract and hold the tough, outer layer of the membrane that encloses the brain, the dura.
  3. Micro Scissors
    For delicate surgeries or dissections, micro scissors are extremely practical. Most of these are spring scissors with fine tipped blades.
  4. Needle Holders
    Needle holders, also known as needle forceps or needle drivers, are used in suturing during a surgical procedure.
  5. Sapphire Blades
    Our sapphire blades are constructed from single crystal, synthetic sapphires (Al2O3). While not as hard as a diamond, they are still hundreds of times harder that steel razor blades. The durability of the blade guarantees a long operational life that exceeds 100 incisions. In addition, the blade and handle can be sterilized using any currently known procedure.
  6. Spatulas, Depressors & Retractors
    Surgical spoons or scoops are used for scraping or debriding tissue. A surgical spoon, curette or excavator can be used to remove pathologic tissue.
  7. Speculums
    Speculums are ADJUSTABLE OR FIXED and they come in stainless steel or titanium. Speculums are vital for any eye surgery or micro surgical procedure.
  8. Stainless Steel Scissors
    Our scissors are designed for various applications. Those with a heavier construction are useful for cutting fur, thicker tissue or vessel. Our fine tip scissors are ideal for use in very restricted spaces.
  9. Tenotomy Scissors
    Tenotomy scissors are used for delicate dissection and cutting, commonly in ophthalmologic, neurological and plastic surgery procedures. They can have delicate blades, or they can have one sharp and one serrated blade.
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