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Laboratory Equipment Blog

  1. What's the Difference between Hanging and Standing Cell Culture Inserts used in EndOhm Chambers
    February 22, 2019
    WPI EndOhm chambers are used with WPI's EVOM2 meter for making TEER (transepithelial electrical resistance) measurements. Here Subhra shows the difference between hanging cell culture inserts and standing cell culture inserts.
  2. Prevent Damage to Snapwell Inserts by Using STX3 Electrode
    February 21, 2019
    The WPI EVOM2 meter is used to measure TEER (transepithelial electrical resistance) in cell culture inserts. The STX2 electrodes with a static length may cause damage to Snapwell inserts. Here Subhra demonstrates how to use the adjustable STX3 electrode to prevent damage to your cell culture inserts.
  3. Choosing an EndOhm Chamber Compatible with your Cell Culture Inserts
    February 21, 2019
    WPI's EndOhm chambers are used with WPI's EVOM2 meter to measure TEER (transepithelial electrical resistance) in cell culture inserts. Three chamber sizes are available for 6-well plates, 12-well plates and 24-well plates. Here Subhra demonstrates how to choose an EndOhm chamber to match the cell culture inserts you are using.
  4. Resurfacing Electrodes in a WPI EndOhm Chamber
    February 21, 2019
    WPI EndOhm chambers are used with WPI's EVOM2 meter for making TEER (transepithelial electrical resistance) measurements. After heavy use your background resistance measurement may start to rise. Your electrodes may need to be resurfaced to remove buildup of proteins, sugars and biological materials. Here Subhra demonstrates how to clean and resurface your EndOhm chambers.
  5. How to Set the Gap on your WPI EndOhm Chambers
    February 21, 2019
    WPI EndOhm chambers are used with WPI's EVOM2 meter for making TEER (transepithelial electrical resistance) measurements. Each EndOhm chamber comes with a "spacer" disk for calibrating the gap between the two chamber electrodes. A consistent gap ensures reliable measurements. Here Subhra shows how to calibrate your chambers.
  6. WPI Zebrafish System Demonstrated in Brazil
    January 03, 2019
    The Butantan Institute, an agency linked to the State Department of Health of São Paulo and one of the largest biomedical research centers in the world, held the 4th edition of the Zebrafish Creation and Management university extension course in December where they exhibited WPI's Zebrafish Microinjection System. The training is aimed at professionals and post-graduate students involved in zebrafish research as an animal model. The program addressed the physical characteristics, the environment of origin and the way of reproduction and growth of this fish. The coordinators are the researchers Mônica Lopes Ferreira and Carla Lima, responsible for the Zebrafish Platform of CeTICS Butantan whose current capacity holds 6,000 adult fish. https://www.redezebrafish.com.br/parceiros           
  7. How To Select Electrodes For Making TEER Measurements
    November 28, 2018
    Selection of Electrodes for TEER Measurements Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER), also referred as the transepithelial resistance (TER) is used to monitor cellular health. TEER is comprised of measurements of the transcellular pathway (i.e., resistance due to an individual cell) and paracellular pathway (i.e., resistance due to the formation of the cellular junctions). TEER is commonly used to monitor cellular confluence. TEER values can indicate changes in the cellular monolayer permeability, showing the monolayer barrier function of cells such as, endothelial (brain microvessel) and epithelial (alveolar, kidney, and intestinal) cells. High TEER values generally reflect tighter cellular monolayers or cellular junctions (Lewis 1996, Matter and Balda 2003, Denker and Sabath 2011). A few major benefits of WPI TEER measurement systems are described below. The TEER values (electrophysiological analysis) can be combined with other analysis methods to further understand
  8. Easily Measure Color Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM)
    October 08, 2018
    What is CDOM? CDOM (Color Dissolved Organic Matter) is organic matter whose optical properties are measurable using WPI’s LWCC (Liquid Waveguide Capillary Cell). CDOM occurs naturally in water systems and is derived from organic tannins. CDOM concentration depends on the location where samples are taken, with coastal waters showing higher CDOM concentrations compared to open-ocean waters. In addition, CDOM absorption depends on open-ocean water depth. Why is the study of CDOM levels important? CDOM is naturally occurring but the environment can influence the level of CDOM in water particles. Measuring the level of CDOM is important because CDOM can have a big effect from fresh to oceanic environments. For example, a higher concentration of CDOM in water particles reduces photosynthesis and negatively affects the food chain.
  9. WPI Awards Prize to The Zebrafish Network Winner
    October 08, 2018
    Jonas de Jesus, from WPI Brasil visit the winner of a contest to name a mascot for the Zebrafish Network. Jonas presented the winner with a surgical kit for zebrafish research. The project "The Zebrafish Network" is a result of the partnership of the Center for Toxins, Immune Response and Cell Signaling (CeTICS) of the Butantan Institute, and aims to promote communication and integration, as well as foster collaborations between researchers studying the fish "Paulistinha ", Which has been used for many scientific studies because of its genetic similarity with humans (70%). "The idea is that everyone who belongs to the network can divulge their work, interact with other researchers and inform about what is happening, such as publication of articles, lectures and congresses on the subject," explains Mônica Lopes , director of the Special
  10. Get a Clean Consistent Cut Every Time with Biopsy Punches
    August 22, 2018
    Clean, Consistent Cut Every Time When you need to quickly take minimally invasive, small samples, the biopsy punch is an easy choice. The biopsy punch is a hand held, pencil-shaped instrument with a slender, pencil-like body. It is lightweight with a hollow, circular, stainless steel, cutting tip. In 1887 Edward Lawrence Keyes, the first president of the American Association of Genitourinary Surgeons, was the first doctor who documented the importance of using the biopsy punch for dermatological diagnostics. He observed that the skin tissue samples can be obtained without complications, minimal bleeding and no need for suturing. Uses for Biopsy Punches Punches are not solely used in dermatology. Biopsy punches are also designed for therapeutics,
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